Homeschool Memoirs #8: Study Spot


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I hope I can be forgiven for recycling an old post for this one since I recently did a post on our “schoolroom.” The only thing that has really changed it that now Brianna prefers to go to her room, rather than the basement. Here’s my recycled post (originally posted March 25, 2008) about where we like to study…

When we first began homeschooling, I had a 3- and a 1-year-old in addition to my 7-year-old homeschooler. Because I needed a place where my little ones could safely play while I worked with my oldest, we set up our basement as our playroom/schoolroom/office. We had a table for school, a comfy couch for reading, a separate area for watching TV or using the computer and lots of toys. The walls were adorned with maps, a dry erase board, a cork board, charts, the ABC’s and lots of fun “educational” pictures and posters. It was the perfect setting. The younger kids could play or watch an occasional video with absolutely nothing in the room that they could hurt or be hurt by. I could sit in the floor and play with them when I wasn’t helping Brianna. Everyone was happy.

As the younger kids got older and started doing their own school work, we decided that it was time to move our operation upstairs. The basement was too far from the bathroom. It was cold in the winter. And, all those fun toys had become a distraction. So, we moved upstairs. The school supplies went into plastic bins in the cabinets of the china cabinet. The books went into a basket in the floor. The ratty-looking cork board was left in the basement in favor of the shiny new one that now adorns one dining room wall. We got an easel for the dry erase board so that both can be easily stored out of site when not in use.

Here are some pictures of our current “schoolroom(s)”:

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As you can see, we do school all over the house. The dining room table makes a great place for seatwork, painting or craft projects. The living room couch or the covered deck are the perfect place for reading. The basement couch is a great place to get some independent work completed without being disturbed by younger siblings.

Being in the main living area of our house works much better for this Mom, too. I can wash dishes, cook lunch or do laundry while the kids are working independently. I’m right there for them to come to me with questions…and to make sure that they aren’t getting distracted. School used to be a big, separate part of our day. Now, it’s just a lifestyle that has become woven into everything else we do as a family simply living our lives.

Oh, and whatever became of our school room? As you can see, it has now morphed into the puzzle-making, sewing, crafting, Wii playing playroom/office/exercise/TV room:

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Where do you and your kids prefer to do school?

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13 Comments

  1. Look at it this was: You just went GREEN with your blog ;). I enjoyed reading your post, that you so much for sharing. Have a wonderful day πŸ™‚

  2. Great post (even if it was recycled) and great pictures. I love seeing kids absorbed in their work. πŸ™‚ Thanks for sharing!!

  3. We have one of those former schoolrooms upstairs. We’d use it about 5 times each year and then migrate downstairs to spread out everywhere for the rest of the year. Except this year, we really do have a separate room that is working for us fantastically!

  4. It's funny how things change isn't it? What seemed to work so well before changes as our lives change. We just have to roll with it & make it work all over again. You've certainly done that well.
    πŸ˜‰

  5. Looks like you found out what has worked at different times in your schooling. I like how your kids study. =)

    Elaine

  6. We school all over as well. There are advantages to it, although sometimes it would be nice to not have school stuff somehow migrating around the house!

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