Homeschool True/False Quiz


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You know those quizzes in magazines or on Facebook that let you see how much you know about a particular subject? Let’s see how much you know about homeschoolers. Keep track of how many correct answers you get! We’ll tally your score at the end and see how much you know about those weird, unsocialized homeschool types.

(These are based on actual questions or statements I’ve heard asked or said about homeschoolers.)

Homeschool True False Quiz: A humorous look at the things people think about homeschoolers

1. Homeschoolers are weird and ugly.

False. Homeschoolers might be weird, but how and where a person is educated has no bearing on his or her physical appearance. I mean, really. I can hear the comments now. “My daughter was so pretty, but then we started homeschooling in 4th grade and, well, she’s just been so ugly ever since.”

2. You can never use the excuse “the dog ate my homework.”

False. We have dogs and cats. Books and papers have, in fact, been eaten here. I have to surmise that our family is not alone in this.

3. Parents homeschool their kids because the parents are lazy.

False. Seriously? Homeschooling is hard, y’all. It is not for the faint of heart.

4. You can never have too many Ticonderoga pencils.

True. I have come to the conclusion that there is a parallel universe inhabited exclusively by single, mate-less socks; Tupperware lids without their corresponding containers; and pencils. Pencils walk away at an alarming rate around here. (And, no, I have no material connection with Ticonderoga pencils. We just think they’re the best. I’d be completely open to having a material connection with them, though – especially given the truth of that last point about pencils.)

5. Homeschoolers have weird schedules.

True. I mean, the schedules aren’t weird to us, but they are definitely different (for most families) than a traditional school schedule because we work at the times that work best for our individual families. Some of us homeschool year round, while others follow a more traditional schedule. Some of us are morning people, while others are night owls. I know at least one homeschool family whose school week is Tuesday-Saturday because it works best with the parents’ work schedule.

6. Homeschooled kids never have homework.

True False. It depends on how you look at it. All of a homeschooled kid’s work is done at home, so it’s all homework. Or, it’s all schoolwork, so there is never homework. I make my kids complete their unfinished work on their own time, so I guess that’s homework. So, that statement would be false at my house.

7. Homeschoolers eat lunch.

True. That may seem like a weird one, but I actually had someone find my blog once by searching the question, “Do homeschoolers eat lunch?” (Who says only homeschoolers are weird.) Yes we eat lunch, though my teens do often sleep through breakfast. Does that make their first meal breakfast? If so, what should we call supper? This may be a trickier question than I thought.

Homeschool Quiz True False

8. Homeschoolers are all super-smart prodigies.

False. Homeschoolers run the gamut of academic ability just like kids in any school setting. I know some super-smart homeschooled kids and I know some who struggle. Most are pretty average in my experience. Of course, if you want to look at their graduation status as a guide, homeschoolers are a pretty smart bunch. Most of the homeschooled grads I know were valedictorian of their class – except some twins I know. They were valedictorian and salutatorian. {grin}

9. Homeschooled kids can’t make it in the real world.

False. Unless we’re living in the Matrix, we all currently live – and are making it – in the real world. All the homeschool grads I know are doing just fine.

10. Homeschooled kids can’t stand in line.

True. As much as I can tell from every homeschool field trip I’ve ever been on, this one is true. Oh, well. If not being able to stand in line is the worst result of homeschooling, I guess we’ll be okay. Most of the homeschooled kids I’ve meet seem to do okay with those little corral things at amusement parks, so the world should be safe from us.

11. Homeschooled kids will never be able hold down a real job because they haven’t learned to get up early.

False. All those homeschool grads I know have mastered the high level skill of setting an alarm clock. Besides, being weird and ugly will probably prevent most homeschool grads from getting jobs in the first place. {For those who may not be used to my twisted sense of humor, that was a joke.}

How did you do on the quiz?

8 – 11 correct answers = Wow! You did amazing! You must be a homeschooled kid or a homeschool parent!

4 – 7 correct answers = You did okay. You must have some homeschooling families in your neighborhood or you’ve run into them at the grocery story. Talk to them next time. They don’t bite. (Well, the little ones might.)

0 – 3 correct answers = Hmm…it sounds like maybe you met that one homeschooled kid that one time – maybe the one that lives down the street from your cousin’s neighbor’s friend. Who knows? Maybe that one really was weird. I mean, the weird ones do exist just like the weird public school kids or your weird co-worker. Give the rest of us a chance. You might be surprised.

What are some weird statements you’ve heard about homeschoolers? Better yet, what did you believe to be true about homeschooling families before you became one?

This post is linked to the Hip Homeschool Hop.

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23 Comments

  1. You are too funny!!
    I was literally yelling at the computer ‘Yes!’ ‘Yes!’ and ‘Yes!’ especially at the parallel universe inhabited by pairless socks. We now only buy black socks FOR EVERYONE and still the most frequently heard complaint in our home is ‘Mummeeee, I can’t find any socks that match!’ How is that even possible? All our socks are the same! But sure enough, even now, none ever seem to match. Something weird and unsocialised is going on in our communal sock drawer…..

    1. It could be in our favor that according to my public schooled middle school niece, mismatched socks are kind of a thing. Like on purpose and everything.

  2. Last year our neighbor asked my then-12-yr.-old daughter if she knew how to read. When she said yes, he proceeded to hand her a book and tell her he was going to ask her questions about the book whenever he saw her. So…I guess another one would be “Homeschooled kids don’t know how to read.”

      1. I have no idea. The funny thing is, my younger kids used to sit out back and read to each other all the time, so I don’t know why he thought an older kid couldn’t read.

    1. I HATE people like that! Usually they are teachers who feel like they own all children within a 25 mile radius. Kudos to you for not toilet papering his house. Or did you? ha ha

  3. Yeap. A friend of a friend asked my son earlier this year how they make friends, since they homeschool. My son responded: “Pleased to meet you. Will you be my friend?”. The kid has been coming around to our house when he’s visiting the estate, so I guess that answered his question… We also have family and acquaintences who would do those random reading and math assessments as part of their civic duty to protect the world from those evil homeschoolers… It was funny when my 13-year old daughter gave a math lesson to a 55-year old man the other day. Oh man, when will the world adapt?

  4. I am a homeschool grad and now homeschooling my girls!:-) Once my mom got asked “But how do your kids get the communicable diseases they are supposed to get as kids!?” Mom’s answer “Oh, we manage.” Hahaha

  5. I did get the “stand in line” comment once and I was completely stunned by it. Part of child-rearing is STANDING IN LINE?!? REALLY?? You think in a family of 5 kids, my children won’t learn to take turns? I commented that they’d get plenty of practice in lines when we went to Disney World for 4 days the next week. Just … wow. I had no idea that was even on the radar.

  6. Ha ha, I got all the questions right. 🙂 I love this article, thank you. I’ve been through everything homeschooling my kids through highschool. I’ve had all kinds of people attack me over the years. Nothing satisfies like having your students quietly get full scholarships and get admitted to top colleges (my oldest is in engineering school at a university). I don’t like to see any kids suffer but it’s quite ironic that the kids of all of those worried parents don’t seem to be excelling. Maybe they should have worried about their own kids instead of mine.

    Keep up the good work with your kids! All of you deserve a huge pat on the back! The light at the end of the tunnel is that you will prevail and your kids more than likely will do well in life an appreciate all that you’ve done.

  7. LOVED this!!
    One of Mom’s friends met the youngest three when we were in Virginia. She admitted that she thought homeschool children wouldn’t be “normal”. After spending a couple of hours with them, she realized how wrong she was.

  8. I passed! I kind of expected to, though, since I homeschool my swarm of six boys (or is that brood? hoard? disaster?). Before we started homeschooling, the only experience I’d had with homeschooling was a 24 year old friend of my hubby’s who just happened to be one of the coolest, most well rounded people I’d ever met. He was hugely influential in my decision to jump into homeschooling. Oddly enough, I’ve never gotten any weird questions about it. I think that’s because when we started we were living in south Texas where it tends to be more common. We live in Illinois now, but it’s pretty widespread up here too.

    1. The same with me! We had a few homeschooling families in our church, and I was always amazed at their skills…. Like, they could even talk to a grown up without shuffling their feet and looking at the ground…. and they were all allowed to pursue their interests and most started their careers very early! One even had become a full fledged computer teacher by 18!

  9. My son insists that I share the strangest question he has ever been asked about being homeschooled– “Are you allowed to say ‘stupid’?” His answer? “That’s the stupidest question I’ve ever heard.”

    Personally, I thought “Do you drink kale for breakfast?” and “Does your mom have a mom blog?” were funnier….. both of which we’ve also been asked.

  10. Not going to lie, the lack of exposure to bacteria kind of killed me when I started high school at a private school. I used to get these really horrific sinus infections. Now they’ve kind of calmed down now, but I still catch a lot of the more nasty bugs from my students, even after four years.

    I think the most annoying question was “Isn’t it weird having your mom teach you?” Well, I don’t know, I’ve been homeschooled since I was five, I don’t know any different. Is is weird having a different teacher every year?

    The best memory I have is my aunt (a public school teacher) gave me a series of books for Christmas with the compliment “these are a few grades levels above you, but I know how good a reader you are, so I think you manage easily” They turned out to be one of my favorite series and I still treasure them!

  11. I was homeschooled and knew a kid who really believed I didn’t have to do any real work or learning because the computer just told me all the answers. Yup.
    Also, this parallel universe you speak of – it’s a real thing, and it’s also inhabited by my toddler’s pacifiers! At least one per week moves to the parallel universe. ????

    1. Apparently along with my son’s 7th grade math curriculum (he claims he didn’t throw it away out of frustration), my pie rack, my older son’s class ring, …. I think we have a black hole in our house. 😛

  12. This is so funny! I have gotten a few of those for sure, but our community has lots of homeschoolers. Most of the other kids think its “unfair” that our kids get to be homeschooled…. they think we live a life of ease…. haha! We did join a co-op this year, where they get to sit in a classroom with a “real life” teacher, and they have been LOVING it! Been the missing link to our learning….

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