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10 Rules for Taking Young Children on a Nature Hike


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Written by Sara Dennis of Classically Homeschooling.

Heading out on a nature hike with my youngest children is always an adventure. There’s so much to do and see. Over the years I’ve discovered that there are 10 rules we must follow when taking young children on a nature hike.

10 Rules for Taking Young Children on a Nature Hike

1. Investigate the slugs.

The first rule of taking young children on a nature walk is you must always stop to investigate the slugs. Grab a small stick and poke at them, watch the mollusks extend and withdraw their antennae, and show fascinated disgust at the goo left in a slug’s wake.

Of course, you can’t then walk away leaving the slug to continue on its solitary slide across the trail. It must be rescued and left safely in the bushes, so no one accidentally steps on it.

2. Pick flowers.

The plethora of flowers lining the path makes for a lovely nature hike. There are yellow, orange, purple, and red flowers beckoning little boys and girls to pick them.

Little boys will carefully choose the perfect flower to give to the love of their life – their mother. Little girls randomly pick every flower they see to create the perfect bouquet.

3. Collect dandelion fluff.

Once children learn that the dandelion fluff they love to blow is actually dandelion seeds, they’ll want to collect as much as they can. The goal is to fill pockets and hats full of dandelion fluff and spread it all over the front yard just for Daddy.

After all, what could make Daddy happier than to walk outside and see his carefully cultivated lawn turned into a large dandelion garden?

4. Chase the birds.

Resident flocks of birds fill some f our favorite nature walk spots. Ducks and geese swim lazily around the lake or come ashore to forage for insects. Seagulls squawk down by the bay and land near the picnic tables to gulp down any leftovers they find.

What could be better for a small child than to rush these flocks of birds and watch them fly away? Or even better, fly up in the air and land a few feet away allowing you to chase them again and again?

10 Rules for Taking Young Children on a Nature Hike

5. Feed the birds.

Even better than chasing the birds is feeding them. Don’t forget to bring bread, fruit, or birdseed along on the nature walk. Little children can spend hours watching the birds eating and slowly edging ever closer.

Then there’s an even better chance of catching a bird to take home!

6. Throw rocks.

Confident that rocks belong in the water, not on the ground, kids will happily spend hours picking up every one they can find to toss in the lake. Small rocks, large rocks, even rocks so large they can barely lift them get thrown back where they belong – into the water.

Then a child will run out of rocks, so they’ll take off their boots and throw them into the water, and wonder why mom is so upset watching the boots floating away.

7. Prepare to be ambushed.

Trees which grow just off the trail are perfect for hiding behind. The kids run ahead, dart behind a tree, and assume you can’t see their jacket waving in the breeze.

As you walk by, they’ll jump out trying to scare you. It’s rather fun actually and keeps the kids moving. However, it does grow old as the kids continue to ambush you every few feet for miles.

8. Jump into mud and water.

It is an unwritten rule of childhood that the moment you see mud and water, you must jump in. You must smear mud all over your clothing and go home dripping wet. There is no other option.

After all, there are mud pies to make, slimy dirt to squeeze through fingers, and more rocks for throwing in the water. Just remember if your kids go home covered with mud from head to toe, you know they’ve had a great time.

9. Use only two speeds.

Young children have two speeds. The first speed is slower than a snail. Kids stop to investigate the leaf falling to the ground or dig up rocks with a shimmer of gold found along the trail. After all, the children have discovered a gold nougat. It takes hours to cover 100 yards.

Then the children switch gears and rush forward. You’re no longer tapping your foot with impatience as the children discover yet another unique blade of grass. Instead, you’re gasping and panting trying to keep up with your little cheetahs rushing forward to find out what’s beyond the next hill.

10. Plan plenty of time.

The most important part of going on a nature hike with young kids is to relax and plan plenty of time to enjoy the walk. Don’t try to rush. Rushing will only frustrate you and your children.

Instead give yourselves plenty of time to pick the flowers, throw rocks, and chase the birds. They’ll grow up all too soon and begin to rush through nature hikes to get back to their computers.

Take your time, relax, and enjoy your nature hike. You’ll create beautiful memories with your kids.

What are your unwritten rules for nature walks with kids?

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3 Comments

  1. Ah, the slugs.My kids are completely fascinated by them and seem to have radar to know where they are at all times. I know this from the “slug juice” I’m constantly trying to scrub off their hands! When we’re hiking, we love to look for animal tracks. We once found some pretty fresh looking bear tracks, which was a bit scary, but we’re still safe and sound today. 🙂

    1. Ewww…slug juice. 🙂 I’m glad you’re all safe and sound. I had one kid – I won’t name names – who almost refused to go on a nature walk one day because there was a sign warning that bears might be in the area. It was a heavily used trail and we weren’t going far, but the whole time he/she followed a few feet behind saying, “I don’t like this. You’re making me do something I don’t like.” Poor kid.

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